Category Archives: HIV care

ACA Open Enrollment is here! Enroll in 2021 coverage today!

Cross-posted from Healthcare.gov blog

You have until December 15 to apply for new 2021 health insurance, or renew, change, or update your 2020 health plan for 2021. Coverage starts January 1, 2021.

variety of people smiling

Important: If you miss the deadline, the only way you’ll be eligible to enroll in or change your health plan for 2021 is if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

How to start or update an application online

  • If you’re new to HealthCare.gov, create an account.
  • If you already have an account, just log in to start or update an application.
  • If you have questions or need help with your application, you can connect with someone on the phone. Call Center Representatives are available most days (except certain holidays) to support your enrollment needs.

See other ways to apply.

New cause of inflammation in people with HIV identified

From MedicalXpress.com

While current antiretroviral treatments for HIV are highly effective, data has shown that people living with HIV appear to experience accelerated aging and have shorter lifespans—by up to five to 10 years—compared to people without HIV. These outcomes have been associated with chronic inflammation, which could lead to the earlier onset of age-associated diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancers, or neurocognitive decline.

Microscopic image of an HIV-infected T cell
Microscopic image of an HIV-infected T cell
Read the full article on MedicalXpress.com.

Protect yourself from the Flu: Important info for people with HIV

From HIV.gov

Getting a flu vaccine during 2020-2021 is more important than ever because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. When you get vaccinated, you reduce your risk of getting sick with flu and possibly being hospitalized or dying from flu. This season, getting a flu vaccine has the added benefit of reducing the overall burden on the health care system and saving medical resources for care of COVID-19 patients.

People with HIV—especially those who have a very low CD4 cell count or who are not taking antiretroviral therapy—are at high risk for serious flu-related complications. For this reason, it is especially important that people with HIV get a flu shot annually. (The nasal spray flu vaccine is not recommended for people with HIV.)

In addition to getting a flu shot every year, people with HIV should take the same everyday preventive actions CDC recommends of everyone, including avoiding people who are sick, covering coughs, and washing hands often.

Read the full article on HIV.gov.

Large NIH Clinical Trial Illuminates Long-Term Health Effects of HIV

From HIV.gov

Initial data from a large NIH-supported clinical trial offer a detailed look at the health status of people aging with HIV around the world. With 7,770 participants enrolled in 12 countries across five continents, the Randomized Trial to Prevent Vascular Events in HIV (REPRIEVE ) is evaluating the ability of a statin medication, pitavastatin, to reduce the risk of heart disease among people with HIV. By leveraging data collected from this diverse group of study participants, researchers also are learning more about the long-term health effects of HIV. They report their initial findings in an August supplement for The Journal of Infectious Diseases.
[…]
For women, accelerated reproductive aging—a natural process that eventually leads to menopause—may heighten risk for heart disease and stroke. Among women with HIV in the REPRIEVE study, more advanced reproductive age was associated with two risk factors for cardiovascular disease: high waist circumference and high blood levels of hemoglobin. Women living in sub-Saharan Africa or Latin America and the Caribbean were more likely to experience accelerated reproductive aging than those living in high-income countries.

The initial REPRIEVE findings also provide insight into the relationship between HIV and heart disease among transgender people, about which little is known. Transgender people are disproportionately affected by HIV, and studies have suggested that hormone use as part of gender-affirming therapy may increase cardiovascular disease risk. By collecting data on gender identity and use of gender-affirming therapy, the REPRIEVE investigators aim to address this knowledge gap. Notably, their initial analysis revealed that high waist circumference was more common among transgender women, particularly those who were receiving gender-affirming therapy.

Read the full article on HIV.gov.

Long-Acting Injectables Hold Promise for Maintaining Viral Suppression and Preventing HIV

Highlights from the Ryan White Clinical Conference on HIV.gov

The promise of long-acting injectable formulations of HIV medications to maintain viral load suppression is closer to reality, according to Constance A. Benson, MD, Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health at University of California San Diego. She shared her assessment during a session at the 2020 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Clinical Conference, held online earlier this month for over 600 physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other key clinical decision makers in HRSA’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program-funded clinics and programs.

decorative imageRead the full article.

HIV.gov: Introducing the “AHEAD” dashboard

To support the efforts of local partners in ending the HIV epidemic in their communities, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is announcing the launch of a new tool, AHEAD: America’s HIV Epidemic Analysis Dashboard.

AHEAD button link
What is the AHEAD Dashboard?

AHEAD is a data visualization tool created to support the efforts of local health departments towards reaching the goals of the Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America (EHE) initiative.

Who Can Use the AHEAD Dashboard?
AHEAD allows jurisdictions, community organizations, and other stakeholders to monitor progress towards meeting the goals of EHE and use data to inform national and jurisdictional action.

Dashboard Overview
AHEAD graphically visualizes data and targets for jurisdictions to track their progress on the six EHE indicators:
•    Incidence
•    Knowledge of Status
•    Diagnoses
•    Linkage to HIV Medical Care
•    Viral Suppression
•    PrEP Coverage

What’s Next? 
Over the next year, AHEAD will add additional features and expanded data sets to further to encourage progress towards EHE initiative goals.

Explore the AHEAD Dashboard today and view our progress towards ending the HIV epidemic in America

Explore AHEAD

FDA Approves New HIV Treatment for Patients With Limited Treatment Options

From the FDA

the FDA logo[On July 2, 2020], the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Rukobia (fostemsavir), a new type of antiretroviral medication for adults living with HIV who have tried multiple HIV medications and whose HIV infection cannot be successfully treated with other therapies because of resistance, intolerance or safety considerations.

“This approval marks a new class of antiretroviral medications that may benefit patients who have run out of HIV treatment options,” said Jeff Murray, M.D., deputy director of the Division of Antivirals in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The availability of new classes of antiretroviral drugs is critical for heavily treatment-experienced patients living with multidrug resistant HIV infection—helping people living with hard-to-treat HIV who are at greater risk for HIV-related complications, to potentially live longer, healthier lives.”

Read the full article on HIV.gov.

HRSA to Host Second Aging with HIV Webcast on June 25

Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA) is continuing to work with RWHAP recipients, subrecipients, and providers to identify and share effective strategies to meet the unique needs of this growing population. As part of this effort, HRSA HAB is hosting its second national webinar in its series on Thursday June 25, 2020, from 1:30-3:30 PM ET, for RWHAP recipients, providers, and people with HIV to share important information about the healthcare and psychosocial needs of people with HIV aged 50 years and older in the RWHAP.

The webinar titled “Psychosocial and Support Needs for People with HIV who are Aging in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program” will feature an epidemiologist, social gerontologist/medical sociologist, HIV advocate, and an AIDS Education and Training Center director who will present on epidemiological data, the significance of psychosocial support services, the impact of isolationism and HIV sigma, and community services.

Connect online at: https://hrsaseminar.adobeconnect.com/aging_with_hiv/. 

Or dial in at 888-469-0647 (Participant passcode: 8812778)

For more information about HRSA’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, visit www.hab.hrsa.gov.

Why are Hispanic/Latino Men 4 Times More Likely to Get HIV Than White Men?

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the hope and promise for a healthier tomorrow might feel reminiscent of another virus — one that ravaged the LGBTQ community in the 1980s and beyond. But in the years since HIV transmission was at its height, has HIV/AIDS started to feel like a bygone disease despite a death toll that has soared over 32 million people worldwide? In the United States, it depends on who you ask. And if you’re part of the Latinx community, the answer is complicated.

Toward the end of 2019, The New York Times trumpeted a promising headline: “New York Says End of AIDS Epidemic Is Near.” The optimistic article sourced the Center for Disease Control (CDC)’s 2010-2016 findings, that rates of infection among gay and bisexual men have remained stable, and that, per Governor Andrew Cuomo, New York is on track to end the AIDS epidemic in the state by the end of 2020.

But while most demographics have experienced a trend-setting decrease in infection rates, the CDC noted that for Hispanic/Latino men, “the annual number of HIV infections in 2016, compared with 2010, increased,” and that during those years, the infection rates for this demographic were “4.3 times that for white males.”

With extensive and varied work, healthcare advocates and community leaders are spearheading efforts across the country to tackle HIV prevention and awareness for the Latinx community. But for many, it’s still an uphill battle.

“I will say I’m proud to be there for them,” says Danny Ochoa of his community. A gay man living with HIV, Ochoa is a Prevention Intervention Specialist in the Community Health Department at Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC). A leader in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy, GMHC’s mission has evolved since its 1982 founding to recognize the importance of inclusion and diversity and has now become a haven for the urban queer Latinx populations. This resource can be just as vital as hospitals and medical centers.

Read the full article.

Tune in as PACHA Convenes Virtually June 1 & 2 to Discuss COVID-19’s Impact on the HIV Response and the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative

The Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) will hold its 67th full Council meeting virtually on Monday, June 1 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020. Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19), the council members will each participate from home, presenters will join remotely, and stakeholders can view the meeting via livestream online.

During the meeting, the Council will:

  • Welcome a new member;
  • Discuss the impact of COVID-19 on the HIV response;
  • Engage with federal HIV leaders on the status of the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative and the Federal responses to prevention and care access challenges resulting from COVID-19; and
  • Hear perspectives and lessons learned on HIV and COVID-19 from PEPFAR.

View the agenda.

The Council will also hear public comments during the meeting. Individuals wishing to make a public comment must pre-register by emailing PACHA@hhs.gov. If you do not pre-register for public comment but decide you would like to submit a statement, please email your written statement to PACHA@hhs.gov by close of business Tuesday, June 9, 2020.

The meeting convenes on Monday, June 1 and Tuesday, June 2, 2020 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM (ET) each day. It will be livestreamed at www.hhs.gov/live. To register, please email Caroline Talev at PACHA@hhs.gov.

Learn more about PACHA on HIV.gov, where you can find links to previous meeting summaries and slides, including those from the February 2020 PACHA meeting held in Washington, DC.