Category Archives: HIV

New cause of inflammation in people with HIV identified

From MedicalXpress.com

While current antiretroviral treatments for HIV are highly effective, data has shown that people living with HIV appear to experience accelerated aging and have shorter lifespans—by up to five to 10 years—compared to people without HIV. These outcomes have been associated with chronic inflammation, which could lead to the earlier onset of age-associated diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancers, or neurocognitive decline.

Microscopic image of an HIV-infected T cell
Microscopic image of an HIV-infected T cell
Read the full article on MedicalXpress.com.

Updating State & Local Health Departments About EHE

From HIV.gov

NASTAD HIV and Hepatitis assistance meeting logoOn October 1, I joined federal colleagues from CDC and HRSA in a virtual meeting with HIV and viral hepatitis program leaders from state and local health departments. The meeting, organized by NASTAD  as the first part of their annual technical assistance meeting, provided an opportunity for sharing updates and engaging in dialogue with these key stakeholders in Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America (EHE). Much of the conversation focused on EHE as well as the broader response to HIV and other infectious diseases amid the pandemic.

Here are some highlights…

COVID-19 and HIV “Virtual Listening Sessions” hosted by HPCP

The HIV Prevention and Care Project at the University of Pittsburgh–on behalf of the Pennsylvania HIV Planning Group–is hosting two COVID-19 and HIV Virtual Listening Sessions. These two sessions will provide a space for people living with HIV in Pennsylvania to share their concerns about COVID-19 and its life-disrupting effects.

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Session 1 will take place on October 14th from 4:00-5:30 pm for the Northwest, Northcentral, and Southwest regions of Pennsylvania.

Session 2 will take place on October 21st from 4:00-5:30 pm for the Southcentral, Northeast, and Eastcentral  (AIDSNET) regions.

Participants are required to preregister in order to receive a link to the virtual meeting. To register and find out more about session 1, click here. To register and find out more about session 2, click here.

You can download a .pdf for LIstening  Session 1  and Listening Session 2 for more information.

CDC HIV Prevention Funding Opportunity for Community-Based Organizations

From HIV.gov,..

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced the availability of fiscal year 2021 funds for a cooperative agreement program for community-based organizations (CBOs) to develop and implement high-impact HIV prevention programs. The Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO), known as  PS21-2102: Comprehensive High-Impact HIV Prevention Programs for Community Based Organizations, focuses on addressing the national HIV epidemic by reducing new infections, increasing access to care, and promoting health equity in accordance with the Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America initiative and CDC’s High-Impact HIV Prevention approach.

Find out more on HIV.gov.

The Single Biggest Risk Factor for Gay, Bi Men Becoming HIV-Positive

From the Advocate.com…

Of all those who became HIV-positive, over a third (36 percent) were persistent meth users. Men aged 36-45 reported the most meth use, and those living in Western states had the highest incidence of the drug.

image of a man with rainbow reflection across his facePersistent meth use is the biggest factor for seroconversion, researchers stated, followed by Black ethnicity and a syphilis diagnosis.

Researchers detailed the correlation between meth and HIV.

“Methamphetamine exacerbates HIV risk via increasing sexual libido while simultaneously reducing inhibitions,” the authors stated, according to AIDSMap. “Our findings highlight the need to address methamphetamine use and its associated risks among sexual and gender minorities, the likes of which may also serve to help end the HIV epidemic.”

Read the full article.

Long-Acting Injectables Hold Promise for Maintaining Viral Suppression and Preventing HIV

Highlights from the Ryan White Clinical Conference on HIV.gov

The promise of long-acting injectable formulations of HIV medications to maintain viral load suppression is closer to reality, according to Constance A. Benson, MD, Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health at University of California San Diego. She shared her assessment during a session at the 2020 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Clinical Conference, held online earlier this month for over 600 physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other key clinical decision makers in HRSA’s Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program-funded clinics and programs.

decorative imageRead the full article.

HIV.gov: Introducing the “AHEAD” dashboard

To support the efforts of local partners in ending the HIV epidemic in their communities, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is announcing the launch of a new tool, AHEAD: America’s HIV Epidemic Analysis Dashboard.

AHEAD button link
What is the AHEAD Dashboard?

AHEAD is a data visualization tool created to support the efforts of local health departments towards reaching the goals of the Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America (EHE) initiative.

Who Can Use the AHEAD Dashboard?
AHEAD allows jurisdictions, community organizations, and other stakeholders to monitor progress towards meeting the goals of EHE and use data to inform national and jurisdictional action.

Dashboard Overview
AHEAD graphically visualizes data and targets for jurisdictions to track their progress on the six EHE indicators:
•    Incidence
•    Knowledge of Status
•    Diagnoses
•    Linkage to HIV Medical Care
•    Viral Suppression
•    PrEP Coverage

What’s Next? 
Over the next year, AHEAD will add additional features and expanded data sets to further to encourage progress towards EHE initiative goals.

Explore the AHEAD Dashboard today and view our progress towards ending the HIV epidemic in America

Explore AHEAD

New study supports more frequent HIV screening among high-risk young men who have sex with men

From Medical Express

A new study has found that HIV screening every three months compared to annually will improve clinical outcomes and be cost-effective among high-risk young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the United States. The report, led by researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), is being published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

group of young men

“Young men who have sex with men account for one in five new HIV infections in the United States. Yet, more than half of young men who have sex with men and who are living with HIV don’t even know that they have it,” says Anne Neilan, MD, MPH, investigator in the MGH Division of Infectious Diseases and the Medical Practice Evaluation Center, who led the study.

“With so many youth with HIV being unaware of their status, this is an area where there are opportunities not only to improve care for individual youth but also to curb the HIV epidemic in the U.S. Despite these numbers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention previously determined that there was insufficient youth-specific evidence to warrant changing their 2006 recommendation of an annual HIV screening among men who have sex with men.”

Read the full article.

FDA Approves New HIV Treatment for Patients With Limited Treatment Options

From the FDA

the FDA logo[On July 2, 2020], the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Rukobia (fostemsavir), a new type of antiretroviral medication for adults living with HIV who have tried multiple HIV medications and whose HIV infection cannot be successfully treated with other therapies because of resistance, intolerance or safety considerations.

“This approval marks a new class of antiretroviral medications that may benefit patients who have run out of HIV treatment options,” said Jeff Murray, M.D., deputy director of the Division of Antivirals in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The availability of new classes of antiretroviral drugs is critical for heavily treatment-experienced patients living with multidrug resistant HIV infection—helping people living with hard-to-treat HIV who are at greater risk for HIV-related complications, to potentially live longer, healthier lives.”

Read the full article on HIV.gov.

HIV, COVID-19 and the importance of public health

From The Hill

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is a sobering moment to recognize and take stock of another epidemic that we have been battling for nearly four decades. The first HIV Testing Day was 25 years ago and emphasized the opportunity for individuals to take control of their health by getting tested for HIV. It has become an annual reminder that the HIV epidemic is still with us. This year the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic threatens the ability of those with undiagnosed HIV and those with other serious conditions to take control of their health.

decorative imageAs an infectious disease physician specializing in HIV, I worry about the many individuals who do not have easy access to HIV testing now because testing venues have been shut down by the pandemic. Already too many of my patients do not discover they have HIV until they are ill with advanced disease or AIDS. In Georgia, the state with the highest rate of new cases in the U.S., nearly one-quarter of patients are diagnosed with AIDS within one year of being diagnosed with HIV.

This means they have been living, undiagnosed, with the virus for up to 10 years and have been unable to benefit from the HIV treatment that could have kept them healthy and prevented transmission to others. This is tragic given that a strong public health system with widespread testing could prevent death.

Read the full article.